Strike for Freedom: The Story of Lech Walesa and Polish Solidarity

November 1, 1982
Amazon

One of the best first books on the labor movement in Poland that ultimately led to the dismantling of the Iron Curtain in Europe.

When army troops stormed through the streets of Warsaw and other cities in a pre-Christmas seizure of Poland, it marked the end of one of the most unusual and, to the Communists, terrifying experiments in democracy ever to rock the empire constructed by Moscow.

For sixteen months, ten million workers led by a charismatic politician named Lech Walesa shook not only Poland and its leadership, but also the rulers of the Soviet Union and other Communist countries.

This is the story of those sixteen months—the story of a movement called Solidarity and the unemployed shipyard worker who led it.

"I declare a strike!" Walesa had shouted, and all of Poland and the world waited anxiously to see if this courageous struggle would remain alive.

It did, for one year and four months.

Solidarity's brief but valiant history is told by Eringer, who was there, assisted by a Polish journalist.

It is also the story of hope—and freedom.

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